SMOKE FROM CALIFORNIA WILDFIRES SMOTHERS PARTS OF THE STATE T

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The death toll has increased to at least 71 in Northern California’s “Camp Fire”. More than 1,000 people are reported missing. That blaze is now 50% contained after consuming more than 147,011 acres. Just outside of LA, the Woolsey Fire 80 percent contained after burning 98,253 acres. Right now, dense smoke from those fires is smothering parts of the state with what has been defined as “the dirtiest air in the world.” Meg Oliver reports.

Mixed emotions among refugees over Trump’s visit:

Among the thousands of people who have lost their homes in Camp Fire, there were mixed feelings over Saturday’s visit by President of united state of America Donald Trump.
President Donald Trump departed for California Saturday to see firsthand the heartache and destruction from the deadliest united states wildfire in this century.
Governors of California, both vocal and Democrats critics of Donald Trump, planned to join the president Saturday. Gavin Newsom and Jerry Brown welcomed Trump’s visit, announcing it’s time to pull together for the California’s people.

Woolsey Fire 78 percent contained:

Repression of the Woolsey Fire jumped to more than 70 percent. Hundreds of upset Malibu residents were uncertain about whether they could return their homes. And firefighters are battling against time, with a red flag cautionary issued for Saturday night into Sunday, including low humidity and winds up to 50 mph. Rain was forecast for mid-week, which is good news because it could help firefighters but people still confused about changing weather. But the emergency management office declares that several communities will have to be “totally rebuilt.”

More than 1,000 missing in Camp Fire:

Sheriff Kory Honea said at a news session this Friday that the death toll in the Camp Fire had increased to 71 and the number of people unaccounted for had risen to 1,011.
Honea warned that this list “variable” and will likely change as a result of multiple names. The list of people missing is derived from three data sets, counting people who called to report someone missing and people who emailed.

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